A Walk in Kent, Part One

It all went very well until the lunch stop. The sun shone; the blackberries we intended to gather in the afternoon were abundant; the path was clear. Fab.

Two year ago, Celia and I did this same walk. In my mind at least, it is the Dead Mothers Walk, as for both of us it had been the summer when our mothers died, and this walk was our day away from normal life and its demands.

Roydon Hall, where once the Maharishi held sway, is still for sale, and had very tasty blackberries we could reach through the fence.

 Roydon Hall with Blackberries


Roydon Hall with Blackberries

The views were splendid.

View with Stately Pile

View with Stately Pile

View

View

We walked and talked. I probably talked the most, coming as I do from a family when talking is something we do a lot.

Time takes on a different quality when you put on your boots and head out for the day. We were in the most populated part of the country and we hardly met a soul. Though for some, being in the country is an opprtunity for violence.

Cartridge

Cartridge

I saw a rabbit, a large one, hopping away from us in the woods. There were deer that watched us warily from a safe distance, and this bird had flown.

Empty Nest

Empty Nest

I would imagine it was a fairly small bird that had chosen this spot, and I had to admire its choice of location.

Ex-Post Box

Ex-Post Box

It was surprising how much of the route we remembered, and arriving at St Michael’s was like seeing an old friend.

St Michael's West Peckham

St Michael’s West Peckham

The organist let us in, and as we looked and read he played.

Looking West to Organist

Looking West to Organist

 What to Look For


What to Look For

 Fifteenth Century Glass


Fifteenth Century Glass

Light fltered through the open door.

Looking Out

Looking Out


In the churchyard, Margaret Wild’s memorial shone in the September sun.
Margaret Wild

Margaret Wild


I spotted this.
101

101

Celia liked the lichen.

Lichen

Lichen

We sat on the same grave we sat on two years ago and ate day-old Eccles cakes. It was already one o’clock. Time to head for the pub where we hoped to have lunch.

This, just beyond the church, by a path that proved impassable due to nettles, should have told us that our plans were about to be thrown off course.

Rubbish and View

Rubbish and View

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12 thoughts on “A Walk in Kent, Part One

  1. You can’t leave it like this. I’m dying to know what happened! I’m assuming that the pub was either closed or no longer in existence. PLEASE do tell all.

    • If I get my work done, you may get part two tonight. Otherwise, not before Sunday evening at the earliest I think. But the pub was the least of our adventure, though perhaps its gateway.

  2. I’ve just noticed that the title of this post is “A walk in Kent, Part One” I’m on the edge of my seat awaiting Part Two.

    • Funnily enough, you aren’t the only one. I have received an email from someone else who follows this page wanting to know what happened next. Maybe I should hand over to Celia, and get her to write it.

    • We looked disapprovingly at the fly tipping, and made various remarks about it, but it didn’t spoil our walk. I am always amazed how people seem to see the countryside as a dumping ground.

    • Walking is so great. I don’t get out walking in the country anywhere near as much as I’d like, or as I used to. It feeds the soul. Glad you enjoyed the pictures. I imagine Kent is pretty different from where you are walking?

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